Friday, Oct. 16, the 290th day of 2020. There are 76 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 16, 1968, American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos sparked controversy at the Mexico City Olympics by giving “Black power” salutes during a victory ceremony after they’d won gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race.

On this date:

In 1793, during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette, the queen of France, was beheaded.

In 1859, radical abolitionist John Brown led a group of 21 men in a raid on Harpers Ferry in western Virginia. (Ten of Brown’s men were killed and five escaped. Brown and six followers were captured; all were executed.)

In 1901, Booker T. Washington dined at the White House as the guest of President Theodore Roosevelt, whose invitation to the Black educator sparked controversy.

In 1916, Planned Parenthood had its beginnings as Margaret Sanger and her sister, Ethel Byrne, opened the first birth control clinic in Brooklyn, New York. (The clinic ended up being raided by police and Sanger was arrested.)

In 1934, Chinese Communists, under siege by the Nationalists, began their “long march” lasting a year from southeastern to northwestern China.

In 1962, the Cuban missile crisis began as President John F. Kennedy was informed that reconnaissance photographs had revealed the presence of missile bases in Cuba.

In 1978, the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church chose Cardinal Karol Wojtyla (voy-TEE’-wah) to be the new pope; he took the name John Paul II.

In 1991, a deadly shooting rampage took place in Killeen, Texas, as a gunman opened fire at a Luby’s Cafeteria, killing 23 people before taking his own life.

In 1995, a vast throng of Black men gathered in Washington, D.C. for the “Million Man March” led by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.

In 2002, President George W. Bush signed a congressional resolution authorizing war against Iraq. The White House announced that North Korea had disclosed it had a nuclear weapons program.

In 2009, agricultural officials said pigs in Minnesota had tested positive for the H1N1 virus, or swine flu, the first such cases in the U.S.

In 2017, Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who had been captured and held by the Taliban for five years after walking away from his post in Afghanistan, pleaded guilty to desertion and endangering his comrades. (A military judge later decided not to send him to prison.)

Ten years ago: Iran freed an American businessman jailed in Tehran for more than two years on suspicion of ties to an allegedly violent opposition group. (Reza Taghavi, 71, hadn’t been charged with a crime and denied knowingly supporting the organization, known as Tondar.) Actor Barbara Billingsley, the matriarch of TV’s “Leave It to Beaver,” died in Santa Monica, California, at age 94.

Five years ago: Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced that the federal government was canceling federal petroleum lease sales in U.S. Arctic waters that had been scheduled for 2016 and 2017. Four Palestinians, including one assailant, were killed by Israeli fire amid continuing widespread unrest as the U.N. Security Council convened an emergency meeting to discuss the escalation.

One year ago: President Donald Trump declared that the U.S. had no stake in defending Kurdish fighters in Syria who had died by the thousands as America’s partners against Islamic State extremists; Trump’s stance on the Kurds was condemned by Democrats and some Republicans who’d been staunch Trump supporters. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other top Democrats walked out of a meeting at the White House, with Pelosi accusing Trump of having a “meltdown”; Trump replied on Twitter that it was Pelosi who had a “total meltdown” and called her a “very sick person.” Bargainers for General Motors and the United Auto Workers reached a tentative contract deal to end a monthlong strike that brought the company’s U.S. factories to a standstill. (Workers voted to approve the contract the following week.) Former Chicago Cubs manager Joe Maddon agreed to a three-year deal to manage the Los Angeles Angels.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Angela Lansbury is 95. Actor Peter Bowles is 84. Actor-producer Tony Anthony is 83. Actor Barry Corbin is 80. Sportscaster Tim McCarver is 79. Rock musician C.F. Turner (Bachman-Turner Overdrive) is 77. Actor Suzanne Somers is 74. Rock singer-musician Bob Weir is 73. Producer-director David Zucker is 73. Record company executive Jim Ed Norman is 72. Actor Daniel Gerroll is 69. Actor Morgan Stevens is 69. Actor Martha Smith is 68. Comedian-actor Andy Kindler is 64. Actor-director Tim Robbins is 62. Actor-musician Gary Kemp is 61. Singer-musician Bob Mould is 60. Actor Randy Vasquez is 59. Rock musician Flea (Red Hot Chili Peppers) is 58. Movie director Kenneth Lonergan is 58. Actor Christian Stolte is 58. Actor Todd Stashwick is 52. Actor Terri J. Vaughn is 51. Singer Wendy Wilson (Wilson Phillips) is 51. Rapper B-Rock (B-Rock and the Bizz) is 49. Rock singer Chad Gray (Mudvayne) is 49. Actor Paul Sparks is 49. Actor Kellie Martin is 45. Singer John Mayer is 43. Actor Jeremy Jackson is 40. Actor Caterina Scorsone is 40. Actor Brea Grant is 39. Actor Kyler Pettis is 28. Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Bryce Harper is 28. Tennis star Naomi Osaka is 23.

Today is Saturday, Oct. 17, the 291st day of 2020. There are 75 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 17, 1933, Albert Einstein arrived in the United States as a refugee from Nazi Germany.

On this date:

In 1777, British forces under Gen. John Burgoyne surrendered to American troops in Saratoga, New York, in a turning point of the Revolutionary War.

In 1814, the London Beer Flood inundated the St. Giles district of the British capital as vats of beer ruptured, sending more than 320,000 gallons of liquid into the streets; up to nine people were reported killed.

In 1931, mobster Al Capone was convicted in Chicago of income tax evasion. (Sentenced to 11 years in prison, Capone was released in 1939.)

In 1939, Frank Capra’s comedy-drama “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” starring James Stewart as an idealistic junior U.S. senator, had its premiere in the nation’s capital.

In 1967, Puyi (poo-yee), the last emperor of China, died in Beijing at age 61.

In 1973, Arab oil-producing nations announced they would begin cutting back oil exports to Western nations and Japan; the result was a total embargo that lasted until March 1974.

In 1979, Mother Teresa of India was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 1989, an earthquake measuring 6.9 in magnitude struck northern California, killing 63 people and causing $6 billion worth of damage.

In 1990, the Internet Movie Database (IMDb.com) was created.

In 2007, President George W. Bush, raising Beijing’s ire, presented the Dalai Lama with the Congressional Gold Medal and urged Chinese leaders to welcome the monk to Beijing.

In 2014, the World Health Organization acknowledged it had botched attempts to stop the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, blaming factors including incompetent staff, lack of information and budget cuts.

In 2018, residents of the Florida Panhandle community of Mexico Beach who had fled Hurricane Michael a week earlier returned home to find homes, businesses and campers ripped to shreds; the storm had killed at least 59 people and caused more than $25 billion in damage in Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia.

Ten years ago: Pope Benedict XVI gave Australia its first saint, canonizing Mary MacKillop, a 19th century nun who was briefly excommunicated in part because her religious order had exposed a pedophile priest.

Five years ago: Thousands of migrants seeking a better life in Western Europe surged into Slovenia using a new route after Hungary sealed its border with Croatia. The final US Airways flight landed in Philadelphia, completing the last leg of its roundtrip journey. (The US Airways brand disappeared as the result of a merger with American Airlines.)

One year ago: Maryland Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings died at the age of 68; the sharecropper’s son had risen to become a civil rights champion and the chairman of one of the House panels leading an impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. The U.S. ambassador to the European Union told House impeachment investigators that Trump had told him and other envoys to work with his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, on Ukraine policy; Gordon Sondland said he was “disappointed” by that directive. Energy Secretary Rick Perry announced that he would leave his job by the end of the year; he’d been under scrutiny over the role he played in the president’s dealings with Ukraine. Chicago teachers went on strike after their union and city officials failed to reach a contract deal in the nation’s third-largest school district. (The strike canceled 11 days of classes for more than 300,000 students.) Character actor Bill Macy, best known as the long-suffering foil to Bea Arthur’s unyielding feminist on the 1970s sitcom “Maude,” died in Los Angeles; he was 97.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Marsha Hunt is 103. Singer Jim Seals (Seals & Crofts) is 78. Singer Gary Puckett is 78. Actor Michael McKean is 73. Actor George Wendt is 72. Actor-singer Bill Hudson is 71. Astronaut Mae Jemison is 64. Country singer Alan Jackson is 62. Movie critic Richard Roeper is 61. Movie director Rob Marshall is 60. Actor Grant Shaud is 60. Animator Mike Judge is 58. Rock singer-musician Fred LeBlanc (Cowboy Mouth) is 57. Actor-comedian Norm Macdonald is 57. Singer Rene’ Dif is 53. Reggae singer Ziggy Marley is 52. Actor Wood Harris is 51. Singer Wyclef Jean (zhahn) is 51. World Golf Hall of Famer Ernie Els is 51. Singer Chris Kirkpatrick (‘N Sync) is 49. Rapper Eminem is 48. Actor Sharon Leal is 48. Actor Matthew Macfadyen is 46. Rock musician Sergio Andrade (an-DRAY’-day) is 43. Actor Felicity Jones is 37. Actor Chris Lowell is 36. Actor Dee Jay Daniels is 32.

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