Monday, Sept. 2, the 245th day of 2019. There are 120 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Sept. 2, 1969, in what some regard as the birth of the Internet, two connected computers at the University of California, Los Angeles, passed test data through a 15-foot cable. The first automatic teller machine (ATM) to utilize magnetic-striped cards was opened to the public at Chemical Bank in New York. (Called a "Docuteller," it was developed by Donald C. Wetzel.)

On this date:

In 1864, during the Civil War, Union Gen. William T. Sherman's forces occupied Atlanta.

In 1930, the first nonstop airplane flight from Europe to the U.S. was completed in 37 hours as Capt. Dieudonne Costes and Maurice Bellonte of France arrived in Valley Stream, New York, aboard their Breguet 19 biplane, which bore the symbol of a large question mark.

In 1945, Japan formally surrendered in ceremonies aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, ending World War II.

In 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Defense Education Act, which provided aid to public and private education to promote learning in such fields as math and science.

In 1960, Wilma Rudolph of the United States won the first of her three gold medals at the Rome Summer Olympics as she finished the 100-meter dash in 11 seconds.

In 1963, Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace prevented the integration of Tuskegee High School by encircling the building with state troopers. "The CBS Evening News" with Walter Cronkite was lengthened from 15 to 30 minutes, becoming network television's first half-hour nightly newscast.

In 1998, a Swissair MD-11 jetliner crashed off Nova Scotia, killing all 229 people aboard.

In 2001, actor Troy Donahue, a one-time teen movie idol, died in Santa Monica, Calif., at age 65.

In 2003, a federal appeals court in San Francisco threw out more than 100 death sentences in Arizona, Montana and Idaho because the inmates had been sent to death row by judges instead of juries.

In 2004, President George W. Bush pledged "a safer world and a more hopeful America" as he accepted his party's nomination for a second term at the Republican National Convention in New York.

In 2005, a National Guard convoy packed with food, water and medicine rolled into New Orleans four days after Hurricane Katrina. Scorched by criticism about sluggish federal help, President George W. Bush toured the Gulf Coast and met with state and local officials, including New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin; at one point, Bush praised FEMA Director Michael Brown, telling him, "Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job."

In 2013, on her fifth try, U.S. endurance swimmer Diana Nyad became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the help of a shark cage.

Ten years ago: Pfizer agreed to pay a record $2.3 billion settlement for illegal drug promotion. A Taliban suicide bomber attacked officials leaving a mosque in Afghanistan, killing the country's deputy intelligence chief and 23 others. Gunmen killed 17 people at a drug rehabilitation center in Ciudad Juarez (SEE'-yoo-dahd wahr-EHZ'), Mexico. A magnitude-7.0 earthquake rocked Indonesia, killing dozens of people.

Five years ago: Islamic State group extremists released a video showing the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff, and warned President Barack Obama against further U.S. airstrikes on the group. Apple said that hackers had obtained nude photos of actress Jennifer Lawrence and other female celebrities by pilfering images from individual accounts rather than through a broader attack on the company's services.

One year ago: Sen. John McCain was laid to rest on a grassy hill at the U.S. Naval Academy, after a horse-drawn caisson carrying the senator's casket led a procession of mourners from the academy's chapel to its cemetery. A huge fire engulfed Brazil's 200-year-old National Museum in Rio de Janeiro, as firefighters and museum workers raced to save historical relics.

Today's Birthdays: Dancer-actress Marge Champion is 100. Former Sen. Alan K. Simpson, R-Wyo., is 88. Former United States Olympic Committee Chairman Peter Ueberroth is 82. Actor Derek Fowlds (TV: "Yes, Minister"; "Yes, Prime Minister") is 82. Singer Jimmy Clanton is 81. Rhythm-and-blues singer Sam Gooden (The Impressions) is 80. Rhythm-and-blues singer Rosalind Ashford (Martha & the Vandellas) is 76. Singer Joe Simon is 76. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Terry Bradshaw is 71. Basketball Hall of Famer Nate Archibald is 71. Actor Mark Harmon is 68. Former Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., is 68. International Tennis Hall of Famer Jimmy Connors is 67. Actress Linda Purl is 64. Rock musician Jerry Augustyniak (10,000 Maniacs) is 61. Country musician Paul Deakin (The Mavericks) is 60. Pro Football Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson is 59. Actor Keanu Reeves is 55. International Boxing Hall of Famer Lennox Lewis is 54. Actress Salma Hayek is 53. Actor Tuc Watkins is 53. Actress Kristen Cloke is 51. Actress Cynthia Watros is 51. Rhythm-and-blues singer K-Ci is 50. Actor-comedian Katt Williams is 46. Actor Michael Lombardi is 45. Actress Tiffany Hines is 42. Rock musician Sam Rivers (Limp Bizkit) is 42. Actor Jonathan Kite is 40. Actor Joshua Henry is 35. Actress Allison Miller is 34. Rock musician Spencer Smith is 32. Electronic music DJ/producer Zedd is 30.

Thought for Today: "Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else." — Margaret Mead, American anthropologist (1901-1978).

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Today is Tuesday, Sept. 3, the 246th day of 2019. There are 119 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Sept. 3, 1943, Allied forces invaded Italy during World War II, the same day Italian officials signed a secret armistice with the Allies.

On this date:

In 1783, representatives of the United States and Britain signed the Treaty of Paris, which officially ended the Revolutionary War.

In 1939, Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand declared war on Germany, two days after the Nazi invasion of Poland; in a radio address, Britain's King George VI said, "With God's help, we shall prevail." The same day, a German U-boat torpedoed and sank the British liner SS Athenia some 250 miles off the Irish coast, killing more than 100 out of the 1,400 or so people on board.

In 1962, poet E.E. Cummings died in North Conway, N.H., at age 67.

In 1967, Nguyen Van Thieu (nwen van too) was elected president of South Vietnam under a new constitution.

In 1970, legendary football coach Vince Lombardi, 57, died in Washington, D.C.

In 1976, America's Viking 2 lander touched down on Mars to take the first close-up, color photographs of the red planet's surface.

In 1978, Pope John Paul I was installed as the 264th pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church.

In 1994, China and Russia proclaimed an end to any lingering hostilities, pledging they would no longer target nuclear missiles or use force against each other.

In 1995, the online auction site eBay was founded in San Jose, California, by Pierre Omidyar under the name "AuctionWeb."

In 1999, a French judge closed a two-year inquiry into the car crash that killed Princess Diana, dismissing all charges against nine photographers and a press motorcyclist, and concluding the accident was caused by an inebriated driver.

In 2003, Paul Hill, a former minister who said he murdered an abortion doctor and his bodyguard to save the lives of unborn babies, was executed in Florida by injection, becoming the first person put to death in the United States for anti-abortion violence.

In 2005, President George W. Bush ordered more than 7,000 active duty forces to the Gulf Coast as his administration intensified efforts to rescue Katrina survivors and send aid to the hurricane-ravaged region in the face of criticism it did not act quickly enough. U.S. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist died in Arlington, Virginia, at age 80, after more than three decades on the Supreme Court.

Ten years ago: Vice President Joe Biden told a Brookings Institution gathering that the Obama administration was fiercely determined to get a health care overhaul, although he conceded it likely wouldn't happen without "an awful lot of screaming and hollering." A private funeral service was held in Glendale, California, for pop superstar Michael Jackson, whose body was entombed in a mausoleum more than two months after his death.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama, during a visit to Estonia, harshly condemned Russian aggression in Ukraine as a threat to peace. President Obama also said the United States would not be intimidated by Islamic State militants after the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff. A judge sentenced Theodore Wafer, a suburban Detroit man who'd killed an unarmed woman on his porch instead of calling police, to at least 17 years in prison.

One year ago: A court in Myanmar sentenced two Reuters journalists to seven years in prison on charges of illegal possession of official documents, a ruling that was met with international condemnation. (The two were freed as part of a mass presidential pardon in May 2019.) President Donald Trump escalated his attacks on Attorney General Jeff Sessions, suggesting that the Justice Department had hurt the chances of Republicans in midterm elections with the recent indictments of two GOP congressmen.

Today's Birthdays: Actress Pauline Collins is 79. Rock singer-musician Al Jardine is 77. Actress Valerie Perrine is 76. Rock musician Donald Brewer (Grand Funk Railroad) is 71. Rock guitarist Steve Jones (The Sex Pistols) is 64. Actor Steve Schirripa is 62. Actor Holt McCallany is 55. Rock singer-musician Todd Lewis is 54. Actor Costas Mandylor is 54. Actor Charlie Sheen is 54. Singer Jennifer Paige is 46. Dance-rock musician Redfoo is 44. Actress Ashley Jones is 43. Actress Nichole Hiltz is 41. Actor Joel Johnstone is 41. Actor Nick Wechsler is 41. Rock musician Tomo Milicevic (30 Seconds to Mars) is 40. Bluegrass musician Darren Nicholson (Balsam Range) is 36. Actress Christine Woods is 36. Actor Garrett Hedlund is 35. Olympic gold medal snowboarder Shaun White is 33. Hip-hop singer August Alsina is 27.

Thought for Today: "In the arts, the critic is the only independent source of information. The rest is advertising." — Pauline Kael, American movie critic (1919-2001).

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