Friday, June 28, the 179th day of 2019. There are 186 days left in the year.

Today's Highlights in History:

On June 28, 1978, the Supreme Court ordered the University of California-Davis Medical School to admit Allan Bakke (BAHK'-ee), a white man who argued he'd been a victim of reverse racial discrimination.

On this date:

In 1778, the Revolutionary War Battle of Monmouth took place in New Jersey; from this battle arose the legend of "Molly Pitcher," a woman who was said to have carried water to colonial soldiers, then took over firing her husband's cannon after he was disabled.

In 1838, Britain's Queen Victoria was crowned in Westminster Abbey.

In 1863, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Maj. Gen. George G. Meade the new commander of the Army of the Potomac, following the resignation of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker.

In 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife, Sophie, were shot to death in Sarajevo (sah-ruh-YAY'-voh) by Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip (gavh-REE'-loh PREEN'-seep) — an act which sparked World War I.

In 1919, the Treaty of Versailles (vehr-SY') was signed in France, ending the First World War. In Independence, Missouri, future president Harry S. Truman married Elizabeth Virginia Wallace.

In 1939, Pan American Airways began regular trans-Atlantic air service with a flight that departed New York for Marseilles (mar-SAYLZ'), France.

In 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Alien Registration Act, also known as the Smith Act, which required adult foreigners residing in the U.S. to be registered and fingerprinted.

In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Uniform Monday Holiday Bill, which moved commemorations for Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day and Veterans Day to Monday, creating three-day holiday weekends beginning in 1971.

In 1994, President Bill Clinton became the first chief executive in U.S. history to set up a personal legal defense fund and ask Americans to contribute to it.

In 1997, in a wild rematch, Evander Holyfield retained the WBA heavyweight boxing championship after his opponent, Mike Tyson, was disqualified for biting Holyfield's ear during the third round of their fight in Las Vegas.

In 2013, tens of thousands of supporters and opponents of President Mohammed Morsi rallied in Cairo, and both sides fought each other in Egypt's second-largest city of Alexandria, where two people — including an American — were killed and scores injured. The four plaintiffs in the U.S. Supreme Court case that overturned California's same-sex marriage ban tied the knot, just hours after a federal appeals court freed gay couples to obtain marriage licenses in the state for the first time in 4 1/2 years.

In 2017, ABC and a South Dakota meat producer announced a settlement in a $1.9 billion lawsuit against the network over its reports on a beef product that critics dubbed "pink slime."

Ten years ago: Soldiers ousted Manuel Zelaya (zuh-LY'-uh), the democratically elected president of Honduras; congressional leader Roberto Micheletti was sworn in to serve until Zelaya's term ended in January 2010. Michael Jackson was honored at the BET Awards, which had been completely revamped to recognize the legacy of The King of Pop, who died three days earlier at age 50. Death claimed TV pitchman Billy Mays, 50, at his Florida home and Las Vegas impressionist Fred Travalena, 66.

Five years ago: Ahmed Abu Khattala (hah-TAH'-lah), the Libyan militant accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attacks in 2012, pleaded not guilty to conspiracy in Washington nearly two weeks after being captured by U.S. special forces. A saucer-shaped NASA vehicle testing new technology for Mars landings rocketed high over the Pacific and deployed a novel inflatable braking system, but its massive parachute failed to fully unfurl as it descended to a splashdown. Actor Meshach Taylor 67, died at his home near Los Angeles.

One year ago: A man armed with a shotgun attacked a newspaper in Annapolis, Md., killing four journalists and a staffer before police stormed the building and arrested him; authorities said Jarrod Ramos had a long-running grudge against the newspaper for its reporting of a harassment case against him. (Lawyers for Ramos, who is charged with first-degree murder, have argued that he was not criminally responsible by reason of insanity; a November 2019 trial is scheduled.) President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin firmed up plans to meet in Helsinki on July 16th.

Today's Birthdays: Comedian-movie director Mel Brooks is 93. Former Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., is 85. Comedian-impressionist John Byner is 82. Former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is 81. Rock musician Dave Knights (Procul Harum) is 74. Actor Bruce Davison is 73. Actress Kathy Bates is 71. Actress Alice Krige is 65. College and Pro Football Hall of Famer John Elway is 59. Record company chief executive Tony Mercedes is 57. Jazz singer Tierney Sutton is 56. Actress Jessica Hecht is 54. Rock musician Saul Davies (James) is 54. Actress Mary Stuart Masterson is 53. Actor John Cusack is 53. Actor Gil Bellows is 52. Actress-singer Danielle Brisebois is 50. Jazz musician Jimmy Sommers is 50. Actress Tichina Arnold is 50. Actor Steve Burton is 49. Entrepreneur Elon Musk is 48. Actor Alessandro Nivola (nih-VOH'-luh) is 47. Actress Camille Guaty is 43. Rock musician Tim Nordwind (OK Go) is 43. Rock musician Mark Stoermer (The Killers) is 42. Country singer Big Vinny Hickerson (Trailer Choir) is 36. Country singer Kellie Pickler is 33.

Thought for Today: "The glory of each generation is to make its own precedents." — Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood, American social reformer (1830-1917).

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Today is Saturday, June 29, the 180th day of 2019. There are 185 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On June 29, 1988, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Morrison v. Olson, upheld the independent counsel law in a 7-1 decision (the sole dissenter was Justice Antonin Scalia).

On this date:

In 1520, Montezuma II, the ninth and last emperor of the Aztecs, died in Tenochtitlan (tay-nohch-TEET'-lahn) under unclear circumstances (some say he was killed by his own subjects; others, by the Spanish).

In 1613, London's original Globe Theatre, where many of Shakespeare's plays were performed, was destroyed by a fire sparked by a cannon shot during a performance of "Henry VIII."

In 1767, Britain approved the Townshend Revenue Act, which imposed import duties on glass, paint, oil, lead, paper and tea shipped to the American colonies. (Colonists bitterly protested, prompting Parliament to repeal the duties — except for tea.)

In 1776, the Virginia state constitution was adopted, and Patrick Henry was made governor.

In 1880, France annexed Tahiti, which became a French colony on December 30, 1880.

In 1927, the first trans-Pacific airplane flight was completed as U.S. Army Air Corps Lt. Lester J. Maitland and Lt. Albert F. Hegenberger arrived at Wheeler Field in Hawaii aboard the Bird of Paradise, an Atlantic-Fokker C-2, after flying 2,400 miles from Oakland, California, in 25 hours, 50 minutes.

In 1936, entertainer and songwriter George M. Cohan was presented with the Congressional Gold Medal by President Franklin D. Roosevelt for his contributions to building American morale during World War I.

In 1967, actress Jayne Mansfield, 34, was killed along with her boyfriend, Sam Brody, and their driver, Ronnie Harrison, when their car slammed into the rear of a tractor-trailer on a highway in Slidell, Louisiana; three children riding in the back, including Mansfield's 3-year-old daughter, Mariska Hargitay, survived. Jerusalem was re-unified as Israel removed barricades separating the Old City from the Israeli sector.

In 1970, the United States ended a two-month military offensive into Cambodia.

In 1995, the space shuttle Atlantis and the Russian Mir space station linked in orbit, beginning a historic five-day voyage as a single ship. A department store in Seoul (sohl), South Korea, collapsed, killing at least 500 people. Actress Lana Turner died in Century City, California, at age 74.

In 2003, actress Katharine Hepburn died in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, at age 96.

In 2006, The Supreme Court ruled, 5-3, that President George W. Bush's plan to try Guantanamo Bay detainees in military tribunals violated U.S. and international law.

Ten years ago: U.S. combat troops withdrew from Iraqi cities, the first major step toward removing all American forces from the country by Dec. 31, 2011. Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff received a 150-year sentence for his multibillion-dollar fraud. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that white firefighters in New Haven, Connecticut, were denied promotion because of their race. Indoor tennis came to Wimbledon as the new retractable roof over Centre Court was closed after rain halted play during a fourth-round match with Amelie Mauresmo (AM'-uh-lee maw-REHS'-moh) leading top-ranked Dinara Safina (dihn-NAH'-ruh sah-FEE'-nah), 6-4, 1-4. (Safina ended up winning, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.)

Five years ago: The al-Qaida breakaway group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, which had seized much of northeast Syria and huge tracts in neighboring Iraq, formally declared the establishment of a new Islamic state and demanded allegiance from Muslims worldwide. Grammy-winning jazz flutist and New Age music pioneer Paul Horn, 84, died in Vancouver, British Columbia.

One year ago: Canada released a list of items, including ketchup, lawn mowers and playing cards, that would be targeted with billions of dollars in retaliatory tariffs against the United States in response to the Trump administration's duties on Canadian steel and aluminum. The Annapolis Capital Gazette newspaper in Maryland kept its promise to put out the day's paper, despite the shooting deaths of five people in its newsroom a day earlier. In response to the fatal shootings at a Maryland newspaper, President Donald Trump said that "journalists, like all Americans, should be free from the fear of being violently attacked while doing their jobs."

Today's Birthdays: Movie producer Robert Evans is 89. Songwriter L. Russell Brown is 79. Singer-songwriter Garland Jeffreys is 76. Actor Gary Busey is 75. Comedian Richard Lewis is 72. Actor-turned-politican-turned-radio personality Fred Grandy is 71. Rock musician Ian Paice (Deep Purple) is 71. Singer Don Dokken (Dokken) is 66. Rock singer Colin Hay (Men At Work) is 66. Actress Maria Conchita Alonso is 64. Actress Kimberlin Brown (TV: "The Bold and the Beautiful") is 58. Actress Sharon Lawrence is 58. Actress Amanda Donohoe is 57. Actress Judith Hoag is 56. Violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter is 56. Rhythm and blues singer Stedman Pearson (Five Star) is 55. Actress Kathleen Wilhoite is 55. Producer-writer Matthew Weiner is 54. Musician Dale Baker is 53. Actress Melora Hardin is 52. Actor Brian D'Arcy James is 51. Actress Christina Chang is 48. Rap DJ Shadow is 47. Actor Lance Barber is 46. Actor-dancer Will Kemp is 42. Actress Zuleikha Robinson is 42. Rock musician Sam Farrar is 41. Actor Luke Kirby is 41. Country musician Todd Sansom (Marshall Dyllon) is 41. Singer Nicole Scherzinger is 41. Comedian-writer Colin Jost (johst) is 37. Actress Lily Rabe is 37. Rhythm and blues singer Aundrea Fimbres is 36. NBA forward Kawhi Leonard of the Toronto Raptors is 28. Actress Camila Mendes (TV: "Riverdale") is 25.

Thought for Today: "Begin somewhere; you cannot build a reputation on what you intend to do." — James Russell Lowell, American essayist (1819-1891).

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