Wednesday, Nov. 13, the 317th day of 2019. There are 48 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Nov. 13, 1956, the Supreme Court struck down laws calling for racial segregation on public buses.

On this date:

In 1312, England’s King Edward III was born at Windsor Castle.

In 1789, Benjamin Franklin wrote in a letter to a friend, Jean-Baptiste Leroy: “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

In 1911, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that an unauthorized motion picture adaptation of the novel “Ben-Hur” by General Lew Wallace infringed on the book’s copyright.

In 1940, the Walt Disney film “Fantasia,” featuring animated segments set to classical music, had its world premiere in New York.

In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a measure lowering the minimum draft age from 21 to 18.

In 1969, speaking in Des Moines, Iowa, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew accused network television news departments of bias and distortion, and urged viewers to lodge complaints.

In 1974, Karen Silkwood, a 28-year-old technician and union activist at the Kerr-McGee Cimarron plutonium plant near Crescent, Oklahoma, died in a car crash while on her way to meet a reporter.

In 1982, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

In 1985, some 23,000 residents of Armero, Colombia, died when a volcanic mudslide buried the city.

In 2000, lawyers for George W. Bush failed to win a court order barring manual recounts of ballots in Florida. Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris announced she would end the recounting at 5 p.m. Eastern time the next day — prompting an immediate appeal by lawyers for Al Gore.

In 2001, President George W. Bush approved the use of a special military tribunal that could put accused terrorists on trial faster and in greater secrecy than an ordinary criminal court. President Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin met at the White House, where they pledged to slash Cold War-era nuclear arsenals by two-thirds.

In 2015, Islamic State militants carried out a set of coordinated attacks in Paris on the national stadium, restaurants and streets, and a crowded concert hall, killing 130 people in the worst attack on French soil since World War II.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama, in Tokyo at the start of a weeklong trip to Asia, said his decision about how many troops to send to Afghanistan would come soon and that he was bent on “getting this right.” U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced a decision to bring professed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four others detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to trial in lower Manhattan (this plan was later dropped). Scientists said analysis of data from two NASA spacecraft that were intentionally crashed into the moon showed ample water near the lunar south pole.

Five years ago: The European Space Agency published the first images taken from the surface of a comet; the photos sent back to Earth showed a rocky surface, with one of the lander’s three feet in the corner of the frame. Clayton Kershaw became the first pitcher to win the National League MVP award since Bob Gibson in 1968; Los Angeles Angels’ outfielder Mike Trout was a unanimous pick for the AL MVP.

One year ago: CNN went to court, demanding the reinstatement of the White House press credentials of correspondent Jim Acosta. (A federal judge later ordered the administration to immediately return Acosta’s press credentials; the White House then dropped its effort to bar Acosta but warned he could have his credentials pulled again.) Amazon announced that it had chosen a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens and Arlington, Virginia, as the two locations for its new East Coast headquarters. (Amazon later abandoned its New York plans amid pushback from politicians and activists.)

Today’s Birthdays: Journalist-author Peter Arnett is 85. Actor Jimmy Hawkins is 78. Blues singer John Hammond is 77. Country singer-songwriter Ray Wylie Hubbard is 73. Actor Joe Mantegna is 72. Actress Sheila Frazier is 71. Musician Andrew Ranken (The Pogues) is 66. Actress Tracy Scoggins is 66. Actor Chris Noth (nohth) is 65. Actress-comedian Whoopi Goldberg is 64. Actor Rex Linn is 63. Actress Caroline Goodall is 60. Actor Neil Flynn is 59. Former NFL quarterback and College Football Hall of Famer Vinny Testaverde (tehs-teh-VUR’-dee) is 56. Rock musician Walter Kibby (Fishbone) is 55. Comedian and talk show host Jimmy Kimmel is 52. Actor Steve Zahn is 52. Actor Gerard Butler is 50. Writer-activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali is 50. Actor Jordan Bridges is 46. Actress Aisha Hinds is 44. Rock musician Nikolai Fraiture is 41. Former NBA All-Star Metta World Peace (formerly Ron Artest) is 40. Actress Monique Coleman is 39. Actor Rahul Kohli is 34. Actor Devon Bostick is 28.

Thought for Today: “I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.” — Jorge Luis Borges, Argentine author (1899-1986).

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Today is Thursday, Nov. 14, the 318th day of 2019. There are 47 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On Nov. 14, 1972, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above the 1,000 level for the first time, ending the day at 1,003.16.

On this date:

In 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln gave the go-ahead for Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside's plan to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond; the resulting Battle of Fredericksburg proved a disaster for the Union.

In 1907, two renowned children's authors were born: William Steig (styg) ("Shrek") in New York, Astrid Lindgren ("Pippi Longstocking") near Vimmerby, Sweden.

In 1910, Eugene B. Ely became the first aviator to take off from a ship as his Curtiss pusher rolled off a sloping platform on the deck of the scout cruiser USS Birmingham off Hampton Roads, Virginia.

In 1940, during World War II, German planes destroyed most of the English town of Coventry.

In 1943, Leonard Bernstein (BURN'-styn), the 25-year-old assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic, made his debut with the orchestra as he filled in for the ailing Bruno Walter during a nationally broadcast concert.

In 1965, the U.S. Army's first major military operation of the Vietnam War began with the start of the five-day Battle of Ia Drang. (The fighting between American troops and North Vietnamese forces ended on Nov. 18 with both sides claiming victory.)

In 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off for the moon.

In 1970, a chartered Southern Airways DC-9 crashed while trying to land in West Virginia, killing all 75 people on board, including the Marshall University football team and its coaching staff.

In 1986, the Securities and Exchange Commission imposed a $100 million penalty on inside-trader Ivan F. Boesky and barred him from working again in the securities industry.

In 1996, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin (BURN'-uh-deen), the senior Roman Catholic prelate in the United States and leader of Chicago's 2.3 million Catholics, died at his home at age 68. Singer Michael Jackson married his plastic surgeon's nurse, Debbie Rowe, in a ceremony in Sydney, Australia. (Rowe filed for divorce in 1999.)

In 1997, a jury in Fairfax, Virginia, decided that Pakistani national Aimal Khan Kasi (eye-MAHL' kahn KAH'-see) should get the death penalty for gunning down two CIA employees outside agency headquarters. (Five years later on this date, Aimal Khan Kasi was executed.)

In 2004, Mahmoud Abbas, successor to Yasser Arafat, escaped unharmed when militants firing assault rifles burst into a mourning tent for the deceased Palestinian leader in Gaza, killing two security guards.

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama, on a mission to repair America's global standing, told Asian countries during a speech in Tokyo that he was determined to engage them as equal partners in the economy, diplomacy and security.

Five years ago: Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced the Pentagon would spend an additional $10 billion to correct deep problems of neglect and mismanagement within the nation's nuclear forces. During his visit to Asia, President Barack Obama mounted a warm show of support for Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (ahng sahn soo chee), appearing with the democracy activist on the back porch of her lakeside home.

One year ago: Chris Stapleton won four awards, including those for male vocalist, song and single of the year, at the Country Music Association Awards, but Keith Urban took home the top prize, entertainer of the year. Jacob DeGrom of the New York Mets easily won the National League Cy Young Award despite winning just 10 games during the season on a struggling team; the American League award went to Blake Snell of the Tampa Bay Rays, who had pitched fewer innings than any other starting pitcher who had won the award.

Today's Birthdays: Actress Kathleen Hughes is 91. Former NASA astronaut Fred Haise is 86. Jazz musician Ellis Marsalis is 85. Composer Wendy Carlos is 80. Writer P.J. O'Rourke is 72. Britain's Prince Charles is 71. Rock singer-musician James Young (Styx) is 70. Singer Stephen Bishop is 68. Blues musician Anson Funderburgh is 65. Pianist Yanni is 65. Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is 65. Former presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett is 63. Actress Laura San Giacomo (JEE'-ah-koh-moh) is 58. Actor D.B. Sweeney is 58. Rapper Reverend Run (Run-DMC) is 55. Actor Patrick Warburton is 55. Rock musician Nic Dalton is 55. Country singer Rockie Lynne is 55. Pop singer Jeanette Jurado (Expose) is 54. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher Curt Schilling is 53. Rock musician Brian Yale is 51. Rock singer Butch Walker is 50. Actor Josh Duhamel (du-MEHL') is 47. Rock musician Travis Barker is 44. Contemporary Christian musician Robby Shaffer is 44. Actor Brian Dietzen is 42. Rapper Shyheim is 42. Rock musician Tobin Esperance (Papa Roach) is 40. Actress Olga Kurylenko is 40. Actress-comedian Vanessa Bayer is 38. Actor Russell Tovey is 38. Actor Cory Michael Smith is 33. Actor Graham Patrick Martin is 28. NHL forward Taylor Hall is 28.

Thought for Today: "The world cares very little what you or I know, but it does care a great deal about what you or I do." — Booker T. Washington (1856-1915).

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